Virtual Teams – Conflict Resolution, Evaluate the team’s pulse

Posted on January 22, 2011 by

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Pulse

What your team's pulse rate?

While environmental IQ through stakeholder’s analysis addresses the outside / in part of the equation, evaluate the team’s pulses addresses the inside / out.  When the two are balanced through an equal amount of attention and thought, then the conflict potential is lowered.

There are two steps for knowing a teams pulse.

The first step is start by helping the team get to know each other better. There are several useful tools which help a team know each other and work together better.  Three recognized ones are:

Absent those tools time spent learning about team members, inside formal meetings as well as through informal activities has a significant payoff.  A project manager should know each team member’s strengths, weaknesses, competencies, preferences and obligations.  Do not assume a job title or role translates into a competency (although it is desirable if it does).

The second step is to ensure a clear, consistent and shared mission exists.  Project charters may have little or no input from the team assembled to implement the charter.  Take time at initiation to ensure understanding of the project’s purpose by all team members.  Do not only rely on the organization’s traditional workflow and communication procedures to provide sufficient communication coverage.

While environmental IQ through stakeholder’s analysis addresses the outside / in part of the equation, evaluate the team’s pulses addresses the inside / out.  When the two are balanced through an equal amount of attention and thought, then the conflict potential is low.

There are two steps for knowing a teams pulse. Start by helping the team get to know each other better. There are several useful tools which help a team know each other and work together better.  Two recognized ones are the Keirsey Temperament and Myers Briggs (EI / SN / TF / JP) (See www.keirsey.com ) as well as StrengthsFinder® developed by The Gallup Organization.  (See www.strengthsfinder.com ).

Absent those tools time spent learning about team members, inside formal meetings as well as through informal activities has a significant payoff.  A project manager should know each team member’s strengths, weaknesses, competencies, preferences and obligations.  Do not assume a job title or role translates into a competency (although it is desirable if it does).

The second step is to ensure a clear, consistent and shared mission exists.  Project charters may have little or no input from the team assembled to implement the charter.  Take time at initiation to ensure understanding of the project’s purpose by all team members.  Do not only rely on the organization’s traditional workflow and communication procedures to provide sufficient communication coverage.